National Roman Museum

National Roman Museum

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About National Roman Museum

The National Roman Museum is a museum in Rome, Italy, having four branches in different buildings. It has exhibits that span the pre-and early history of Rome, from the fifth century BC to the third century AD, with a priority on archaeological discoveries from the time of Ancient Rome. It was built in 1889 and inaugurated a year later after Italy's unification.

The original site (sometimes referred to as the Terme Museum, terme being Italian for "thermal baths"), the Palazzo Altemps, the Palazzo Massimo, and the Crypta Balbi were all bought in the 1980s. The museum was reorganised into four locations: the original site (sometimes referred to as the Terme Museum), the Palazzo Altemps, the Palazzo Massimo, and the Crypta Balbi. Antiquities unearthed in Rome since 1870 make up most of the museum's holdings. The buildings were adapted for a new use for the 1911 World's Fair and were completed in 1930. The Baths of Diocletian, the Crypta Balbi, the Palazzo Massimo, and the Palazzo Altemps were divided into four branches after a comprehensive makeover in 1990.

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 National Roman Museum Palazzo Massimo alle Terme
Palazzo Massimo alle Terme

The Palazzo Altemps was a 16th-century mansion that was opened to the public in 1997 after considerable renovation. The collections of Marco Sittico Cardinal Altemps, Ludovico Cardinal Ludovisi (also known as the Boncompagni Ludovisi marble collection), and others are housed here. On the bottom floor, there are two sculptures that stick out.

The first floor is a Greek bronze statue known as 'Boxer at Rest' or 'Boxer of the Quirinal,' the second is a sculpture of Emperor Augustus that stands out because it depicts him as the pontifex Maximus or supreme priest. Portraits of various Roman emperors, including Hadrian and Vespasian, may be found on the first floor. A collection of frescoes, including some from the Villa Farnesina, and several sarcophagi may be seen on the top floor. The museum's significant coin collection is housed in the basement.

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Baths of Diocleziano National Roman Museum
Baths of Diocleziano

The Baths of Diocletian were Ancient Rome's most spectacular and biggest public baths. They were constructed by Maxentius between 298 and 306 AD in honor of Emperor Diocletian, and while having a similar structure to many other baths in Rome, their enormous scale stood out. They were so large that they could hold up to 3,000 people. The major purpose of the Baths of Diocletian, according to legend, was to outshine the Baths of Caracalla, which is why they were built to accommodate twice as many people.

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 National Roman Museum Palazzo Altemps
Palazzo Altemps

This is one of Rome's most intriguing Renaissance architectural specimens. It has been a part of one of the four sections of the Roman National Museum since 1997. Between the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, the Palazzo Altemps housed an outstanding collection of Greek and Roman sculpture that belonged to numerous families of the Roman nobility.

The sculptures are displayed in lovely chambers with frescoes on the walls and ceilings. The Altemps Collection figurines are also on exhibit on the magnificent patio and adjacent to the majestic staircase. Although Cardinal Altemps owns over 100 paintings, many are on show in other institutions, such as the Louvre.

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National Roman Museum Crypta Balbi
Crypta Balbi

From ancient to the present, it depicts the evolution of Roman civilization and the urban landscape. The theatre of Balbus (13 BC), which was located on the field of Mars at the time, was the site of Crypta Balbi. This museum houses artefacts discovered during the excavation of this archaeological site. Aside from it, the museum features a display about Rome in the 5th and early Middle Ages.

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Why visit the National Roman Museum?

National Roman Museum

Palazzo Massimo alle Terme-

One of the important reasons you should visit and explore the National Roman Museum. The Palazzo Massimo alle Terme, a 16th-century mansion, was opened to the public in 1997 after considerable renovation. It is home to one of the world's most impressive archaeological collections. Built between 1883 and 1887, the museum structure is a Renaissance structure.

Baths of Diocleziano-

It is a magnificent place to explore the National Roman Museum. The Baths of Diocletian were Ancient Rome's most spectacular and biggest public baths. Emperor Diocletian constructed them in 305 AD, with a seating capacity of over 3,000 persons.

Palazzo Altemps-

It holds a significant collection of Greek and Roman sculptures that formerly belonged to many generations of Roman aristocracy in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries and is a reason why one should visit this place. The masterpieces are displayed in magnificent halls with frescoes on the walls and ceilings.

Crypta Balbi-

Here, we may see the past of Rome via the studies carried out in their lands and why you should explore the National Roman Museum. It was constructed under Lucius Cornelius Balbus' instructions between 19 and 13 BC. A theatre, a four-story building, and a courtyard were formerly part of the complex.

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National Roman Museum: Opening hours and Address

National Roman Museum

Opening Hours-

Are open from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. from Tuesday to Sunday Mondays, December 25th and January 1st are closed to the public

Address-

Palazzo Massimo alle Terme- Largo di Villa Peretti, 2 Palazzo Altemps- Piazza Sant'Apollinare 46-48 Crypta Balbi- Via delle Botteghe Oscure, 31 Terme di Diocleziano- Via delle Terme di Diocleziano

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FAQs

Where is National Roman Museum?

The National Roman Museum, with several branches across the city, is located in Rome, Italy (Address- Via Delle Botteghe Oscure, 31). The National Roman Museum is housed in four separate structures, i.e., Diocletian's Baths, Palazzo Altemps, Crypta Balbi, and Palazzo Massimo.

How many museums are there in National Roman Museums?

The Baths of Diocletian, the Palazzo Altemps, the Crypta Balbi, and the Palazzo Massimo make up the National Roman Museum, which comprises four separate museums and places across the city.

What are the opening hours of National Roman Museums?

The National Roman Museum timings are scheduled for the week and are open from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. throughout Tuesday to Sunday. Although, Mondays, December 25th and January 1st are closed to the public who wish to explore the National Roman Museum.

Why visit National Roman Museum?

Among the many reasons you should visit and explore the National Roman Museum is because it holds a significant collection of Greek and Roman sculptures that formerly belonged to many generations of Roman aristocracy in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. The masterpieces are displayed in magnificent halls with frescoes on the walls and ceilings.

What is in the National Museum of Rome?

The Nation Museum of Rome is a museum that houses artefacts discovered during the excavation of this archaeological site. Apart from it, the museum features a display about Rome in the 5th and early Middle Ages.

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